You are currently browsing the Loren E. Chadima's Intentional Acting blog archives for October, 2012.

Download our ebook and Acting Tips!

* indicates required

 

Email Format

Class Calendar

October 2012
M T W T F S S
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031EC

Upcoming Classes

  • No events.

Archive for October, 2012

Posted by admin, October 10, 2012 11:27 am

Actors’ eyes light up when they see sarcasm in a script. It’s fun and it seems like this is the writer making the actor’s job easy, but it’s not. Sarcasm can be trap because it is more of an attitude than an intention and it limits your work as an actor.

Look up sarcasm in a dictionary. Sarcasm: Noun – to mock or convey contempt.  First of all, it’s a noun and not a verb.  But mocking or conveying contempt – those are verbs. Yes, but how do they connect you to the other person and make them the most important person in the scene?  Look up contempt: The feeling that a person is beneath consideration, worthless or deserving scorn. Excellent! Now this gives you something to make the other person feel, making them the most important person in the scene.

When you see a sarcastic line instead of thinking “I just have to be sarcastic” think:  “How can I make the other person feel beneath my consideration and worthless?”  This is so much more specific and interesting. It will give you something to listen for and something specific to make the other person feel or do.

Share your answer, ideas, and experiences here.  Let this be a place that actors can learn from one another.

Posted by admin, October 3, 2012 11:19 am

A good intention will connect you to the other person in the scene. Let’s qualify a good intention. So is “I want the ice cream.” a good intention?  Actually, I call it an action, not an intention.  Notice the difference. Action: “I want the ice cream.”  Intention (to make another person feel or do something) “I need you to give me the ice cream.”

What connects actors and puts life into a scene is actors needing something from one another, in other words having intentions. “I want the Ice cream.” says that I can take it from you and I don’t need you to do anything.  Whereas, “I need you to give me the ice cream” makes you need the other actor and have to engage with them in an action. The latter will give both actors something to do and remember Acting is Doing. Also notice that intention is more specific than an action which is always better.

Question: which choice gives you more to do and connects you to the other actor? Choice A: To seduce you or choice B: I need you to kiss me.

Share your answer, ideas, and experiences here. Let this be a place that actors can learn from one another.

 

You are currently browsing the Loren E. Chadima's Intentional Acting blog archives for October, 2012.

Audition Tips