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Archive for April, 2014

Posted by admin, April 20, 2014 9:00 am

This is an excerpt from actor Jane Lynch’s commencement “YES AND” speech at Smith College.

“YES AND” is the vital and only rule of improvisation. Never deny your fellow actor. You should be willing and able to accept whatever your fellow improviser throws at you. Use that as your jumping off point and expand it.

Heighten and Explore. For instance, if I say to you “Stick ’em up!” and you say “That’s not a gun, that’s your finger!” We’ve got nowhere to go. If I say “What a beautiful day” and you say, “No it’s not, it’s the middle of winter and it’s snowing!” Where do we go?

In order for our scene to go forward, we affirm what the other is saying, which is the “YES” and take it and build on it with “AND.” And in order for our lives to go forward to engage fully in life, we need to be willing and able to accept what is right in front of us. Whatever it is, the good, the bad, the thrilling, the heartbreaking, every emotion, occurrence, event, person, place or thing, you will experience them all. That’s the “YES” I’m talking about. And the acceptance and embrace of it with all your heart and doing something with it, that’s the “AND.”

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YES, Jane! AND I would add that living in “YES AND” allows you to BE IN THE MOMENT which is an essential tool for a great actor and a happy human being.

If you’re an actor or know someone who is feel free to share this article on being present with those you believe could benefit from it. Thank you.

Remember, as an actor, you’re part of an inspiring community. Share your experiences in the comments below. This is your inspirational story and can serve as a valuable learning tool for others.

__________________________

LIVE THE DREAM YOU WERE BORN TO!

Acting should be simple. But that doesn’t mean it’s easy. If you’re an actor or you know someone who is, there is no better moment than now to make the intention to take full control of your acting career and live the dream you were born to.

Call 818-325-5752 or email me at Loren@IntentionalActing.com to interview and sign up for the next Intentional Acting class today.

In the meantime, to learn more about Intentional Acting and the 9 Questions that frame the work do with actors of all ages visit www.intentionalacting.com/what-is-intentional-acting/.

 

 

Posted by admin, April 15, 2014 8:57 am

By Loren Chadima

What happened the moment before the scene started? This is a key question guaranteed to get your scene off to a strong start. But be sure you answer it specifically.

Clues Are In the Script In my experience as a coach and director, I’ve found most actors attend the University of MSU (Make Stuff Up) and fail to look for the answer in the script. Even though the clues are in the script, actors fall prey to getting overly creative and they improvise what happened.

Creativity and improvisation are key skillsets for actors, but not when it comes to being clear on what happened in the moments leading up to a specific scene. Before going to MSU, read the script again with the intention that the writing will tell you what happened the moment before.

The Moment Before

Remember it’s the moment before, not the hour or day before. What happened the second before your scene started?  Think logically: what did the last person say before you entered or what would have happened before this scene.

Use your moment before to make a strong choice. Come in expecting the opposite of what actually happens in the scene. For example: The script says your character asks your boss for a raise and the boss says “No.”  Enter the scene expecting your boss to say, “Yes” and allow yourself to discover the disappointment of not getting the raise.

Comment below to let other actors know how your choices for the moment before helps your auditions.

__________________________

If you’re an actor or know someone who is feel free to share this article on being present with those you believe could benefit from it. Thank you.

Remember, as an actor, you’re part of an inspiring community. Share your experiences in the comments below. This is your inspirational story and can serve as a valuable learning tool for others.

__________________________

LIVE THE DREAM YOU WERE BORN TO!

Acting should be simple. But that doesn’t mean it’s easy. If you’re an actor or you know someone who is, there is no better moment than now to make the intention to take full control of your acting career and live the dream you were born to.

Call 818-325-5752 or email me at Loren@IntentionalActing.com to interview and sign up for the next Intentional Acting class today.

In the meantime, to learn more about Intentional Acting and the 9 Questions that frame the work I do with actors of all ages visit www.intentionalacting.com/what-is-intentional-acting/.

 

 

Posted by admin, April 10, 2014 9:00 am

Congrats to Jordan Andrews for booking a Pilot called “The Royals”!  Way to go!

Posted by admin, April 8, 2014 9:56 pm

A HUGE congrats to Yanellie Ireland for booking a Co-Star role on the CBS show “Intelligence”, season 1 episode 8 “Delta Force”!!

Posted by admin, 9:39 pm

By Loren Chadima

Actors’ eyes light up when they see sarcasm in a script. It’s fun and it seems like this is the writer making the actor’s job easy, but it’s not.

Sarcasm can be a trap because it is more of an attitude than an intention. And contrary to what you may have been taught, sarcasm limits your work as an actor.

To Mock

Sarcasm can be defined in many ways, but perhaps the simplest is how it is defined in the dictionary. Sarcasm: Noun – to mock or convey contempt.

First of all, it’s a noun and not a verb.  But mocking or conveying contempt – those are verbs. Yes, but how do they connect you to the other person and make them the most important person in the scene?  Go deeper. Look up conveying contempt.

According to the dictionary, contempt means: The feeling that a person is beneath consideration, worthless or deserving scorn. Excellent! Now this is valuable for an actor, as it gives you something to make the other person feel, making them the most important person in the scene.

How Can I Make The Other Person Feel Beneath Me

When you see a sarcastic line instead of thinking “I just have to be sarcastic” think:  “How can I make the other person feel beneath my consideration and worthless?”  This is so much more specific and interesting. It will give you something to listen for and something specific to make the other person feel or do.

__________________________

If you’re an actor or know someone who is feel free to share this article on being present with those you believe could benefit from it. Thank you.

Remember, as an actor, you’re part of an inspiring community. Share your experiences in the comments below. This is your inspirational story and can serve as a valuable learning tool for others.

__________________________

LIVE THE DREAM YOU WERE BORN TO!

Acting should be simple. But that doesn’t mean it’s easy. If you’re an actor or you know someone who is, there is no better moment than now to make the intention to take full control of your acting career and live the dream you were born to.

Call 818-325-5752 or email me at Loren@IntentionalActing.com to interview and sign up for the next Intentional Acting class today.

In the meantime, to learn more about Intentional Acting and the 9 Questions that frame the work I do with actors of all ages visit www.intentionalacting.com/what-is-intentional-acting/.

 

 

Posted by admin, April 1, 2014 8:00 am

By Loren Chadima

Ask anyone who has taken classes at Intentional Acting and they will tell you intention is the name of the game. So let’s play a quick game and qualify what makes a good intention.

Is “I want the ice cream,” a good intention?  Or is it an action?

It is an action. A good intention will connect you to the other person in the scene. To reframe that line so that it is an intention and makes another person feel or do something, it would read something like this: “I need you to give me the ice cream.”

Acting Is Doing

What connects actors and puts life into a scene is actors needing something from one another, in other words having intentions. “I want the Ice cream.” says that I can take it from you and I don’t need you to do anything.

Whereas, “I need you to give me the ice cream” makes you need the other actor and have to engage with them in an action. The latter will give both actors something to do. And remember Acting is Doing. Also notice that intention is more specific than an action, which is always better.

__________________________

If you’re an actor or know someone who is feel free to share this article on being present with those you believe could benefit from it. Thank you.

Remember, as an actor, you’re part of an inspiring community. Share your experiences in the comments below. This is your inspirational story and can serve as a valuable learning tool for others.

__________________________

LIVE THE DREAM YOU WERE BORN TO!

Acting should be simple. But that doesn’t mean it’s easy. If you’re an actor or you know someone who is, there is no better moment than now to make the intention to take full control of your acting career and live the dream you were born to.

Call 818-325-5752 or email me at Loren@IntentionalActing.com to interview and sign up for the next Intentional Acting class today.

In the meantime, to learn more about Intentional Acting and the 9 Questions that frame the work I do with actors of all ages visit www.intentionalacting.com/what-is-intentional-acting/.

 

 

 

You are currently browsing the Loren E. Chadima's Intentional Acting blog archives for April, 2014.

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