You are currently browsing the Loren E. Chadima's Intentional Acting blog archives for December, 2014.

Download our ebook and Acting Tips!

* indicates required

 

Email Format

Class Calendar

December 2014
M T W T F S S
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031EC

Upcoming Classes

  • No events.

Archive for December, 2014

Posted by admin, December 29, 2014 6:08 pm

Winter is a fallow time; a time for nature to rest before expending energy to bloom in the spring.

Actors and creative artists need fallow time as well.  We need down time to regroup, reflect, rest, and drink in the life experiences that we then use to feed our creative expression.

In the next couple of weeks before pilot season begins, give yourself some fallow time.  Enjoy the holidays with your family; without working, without worrying about how your career will bloom next year.

Rest, relax, reflect.  There will be plenty of time to get things started and to make things happen in 2014.

May joy and peace fill your holidays.  And may abundance of love and opportunity fill your New Year.

Thank you for allowing me to be of service to you and your dreams.

Loren
_____________________________________

How are you and your family spending the holidays?  Share your thoughts and experiences for what you do to rest, relax and reflect in the comments below. Thank you.
_____________________________________

LIVE THE DREAM YOU WERE BORN TO

Acting should be simple.  But that doesn’t mean it’s easy.  If you’re an actor or you know someone who is, there is no better moment than 2014 to make the intention to take full control of your acting career and live the dream you were born to.

Call 818-985-8504 or email me at Loren@IntentionalActing.com to schedule an interview in January and sign up for next year’s Intentional Acting classes.

In the meantime, to learn more about Intentional Acting and the 9 questions that frame the work I do with actors of all ages visitwww.intentionalacting.com/what-is-intentional-acting/.

Loren E. Chadima

Bring Out Your Best When It Matters Most!

818-985-8504

818-325-5752 cell

www.IntentionalActing.com

Loren@IntentionalActing.com

 

LIKE my PAGE Today!

Facebook:   Intentional Acting

 

Follow Me on Twitter

http://twitter.com/lorenchadima

The information in this email, and any attachments, may contain confidential information and is intended solely for the attention and use of the named addressee(s). It must not be disclosed to any person(s) without authorization. If you are not the intended recipient, or a person responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient, you are not authorized to, and must not, disclose, copy, distribute, or retain this message or any part of it. If you have received this communication in error, please notify the sender immediately.

Please consider the environment before printing this email

Posted by admin, December 22, 2014 7:33 pm

Gratitude Defined: Expressing thanks for favors received.

John McCarthy Casting estimates that there are up to 2000 people submitting for every single role.  If you get an audition, he says, “You should be grateful.”

Being grateful isn’t relegated to just working as a paid actor. If you’re reading this, whether you are being paid or not, being an actor means living the life you were born to.  It might not be easy, and you might be paid, right now, and contrary to what many of us may have been taught, no one struggles in isolation and no one triumphs in obscurity.  Actors have so much to be grateful for.

GRATEFUL FOR OPPORTUNITIES

To those of us in Los Angeles pursuing our dream, we forget that we are very lucky to live here in the Entertainment Industry capital.  We forget to be grateful that we have agents and managers.  And that we get to go on auditions for commercials, television, and film that other people watch at home.

Many people around the world would love to be able to do these things.  I know because I get emails from people from all over asking how they can get the opportunities that we have.

Other people in this world are not so lucky.  Some don’t even have the luxury to think about acting because all they can think about is how their family will survive the winter.

At your next audition, be grateful for the opportunity to be seen by this Casting Director.   Be grateful to your agent for the work they did to get you there.   And be grateful to anybody or anything that helped you get to that audition – like a kind boss who let you out of work or your car that got you there safely.

 

When you walk into your audition with gratitude, you are empowering yourself to rise above any and all perceived obstacles.

I AM GRATEFUL FOR YOUR SUPPORT

My passion for inspiring actors not only brings me a tremendous amount of joy, but this work allows me to take care of my family doing what I love. For this I am incredibly grateful for you and everyone who has supported Intentional Acting by reading my posts and for the work I’m called to do through Intentional Acting.

Blessings to your and your family and have a happy and joyous Holiday season.

Loren
_____________________________________

Please feel free to share this article with those you believe could benefit from it. And if you have any stories about how gratitude has helped your career please share below in the comments. Thank you.
_____________________________________
To learn more about Intentional Acting for actors of all ages visit www.intentionalacting.com/what-is-intentional-acting/ or call 818-985-8504 or email me at Loren@IntentionalActing.com

Loren E. Chadima

Bring Out Your Best When It Matters Most!

818-985-8504

818-325-5752 cell

www.IntentionalActing.com

Loren@IntentionalActing.com

 

LIKE my PAGE Today!

Facebook:   Intentional Acting

 

Follow Me on Twitter

http://twitter.com/lorenchadima

The information in this email, and any attachments, may contain confidential information and is intended solely for the attention and use of the named addressee(s). It must not be disclosed to any person(s) without authorization. If you are not the intended recipient, or a person responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient, you are not authorized to, and must not, disclose, copy, distribute, or retain this message or any part of it. If you have received this communication in error, please notify the sender immediately.

Please consider the environment before printing this email

Posted by admin, December 15, 2014 5:29 pm

Traditionally, pilot season runs from the beginning of January to about the first week of May.  With the proliferation of cable television, however, pilots now are being shot all year long.

A “pilot” is a sample episode that is presented to a network.  If the network likes it, they will air it to see what the ratings and reactions are to the show.  If it gets good ratings, the network will order another 7 to 13 episodes to air at the start of their season.

When you audition for a pilot, you never know if it will actually air on television.  Regardless, being cast is an invaluable opportunity to work, meet directors and producers, and boost your resume…so be ready!!

So how do you prepare for Pilot Season?

1.  Be in acting class! This is most important thing you can do to be at the top of your game.  Have a coach ready for last minute auditions.  It’s what working actors do so if you want to compete, you should, too.   And when you get that callback, make sure to schedule another coaching!  I’ve seen so many great opportunities missed because an actor didn’t come in prepped to book the job.

2.  Make sure your resume and pictures are up-to-date on casting websites, such as LA Casting and Now Casting.  And for heaven’s sake, make sure your agent and/or manager have what they need (current headshots, resumes, work permits, etc.) to get you hired quickly!

3.  Do your research.  Go on the internet and find out as much as you can about the show you’re auditioning for.  If you don’t find anything, Google the network, producers, and directors.

4.  For young actors, be sure your work permit is up to date.

5.  Take it easy: this is also the time for colds and flu, so get plenty of rest.

And as always, don’t forget:   Have Fun!

Let us know your thoughts on this blog and be sure to share how you’ve prepared to leverage the opportunities of pilot season.

________________

 

If you’re an actor, (or know someone who is) feel free to share this article with those you believe could benefit from it. Thank you.

 

And risk being vulnerable right here. Share your experience as a fearless or fearful actor. Who knows, your input just might make the difference in preparing and inspiring someone to deliver the performance of a lifetime!

____________________________

 

LIVE THE DREAM YOU WERE BORN TO

 

Acting should be simple. But that doesn’t mean it’s easy. If you are an actor, or know someone who is, and you need a safe place to be yourself and to be challenged to continually grow and share vulnerable performances, Intentional Acting may be the right class for you.

 

There is no better moment than now to make the intention to take full control of your acting career and live the dream you were born to.

 

Call 818-325-5752 or email me at Loren@IntentionalActing.com to interview and sign up for the next Intentional Acting class today.

 

In the meantime, to learn more about Intentional Acting and the 9 questions that frame the work I do with actors of all ages, visit www.intentionalacting.com/what-is-intentional-acting/.

 

 

 

Posted by admin, December 9, 2014 12:08 am

What now??

Answer:  make your partner the most important person in the scene.  Yeah, I know it’s hard when you just want to say, “Get into class!”   But don’t forget: natural acting happens when you’re being, not “acting”.  And the #1 way to “not act” is to focus on your scene partner and really listen.  This will keep you focused, honest, engaged, and (ultimately) present in the scene.  Remember the 9 Questions of Intentional Acting? A really good example of Question #8 is in the film Meet Joe Black starring Brad Pitt and Anthony Hopkins.  Frankly, I wasn’t impressed with Pitt’s performance – particularly when paired with the great Sir Anthony; the gap of experience between the actors was very apparent in one scene. But I *was* impressed when Hopkins didn’t do anything differently just because his scene partner couldn’t hold his own:  he made Pitt the most important person in the scene and by doing so gave a stunning performance.   (For those of you who are upset with me for dissing Mr. Pitt: I think his work as an actor has grown tremendously and I have great respect for him now!)

What *Not* to do When Acting with a Lousy Scene Partner or a Reader Who Won’t Even Look at You:

1) Don’t judge your partner – if you do, you won’t be in the scene anymore.  Reframe it.  Use what you’re getting - which maybe lousy acting - and make your intention: to get them to listen and connect with you.

2) Don’t let your irritation or impatience show.  It’s unprofessional and it does NOT reflect badly on your scene partner, it reflects poorly on YOU.  Be like Anthony Hopkins in Meet Joe Black: Do your best work and leave the judging to the casting team.  It may seem counter intuitive, but put all your attention over there on the lousy scene partner or reader…then discover what can happen!

Share your comment below on what happens when you make the other person the most important person in the scene.

__________________________

If you’re an actor, (or know someone who is) feel free to share this article with those you believe could benefit from it. Thank you.

 

And risk being vulnerable right here. Share your experience as a fearless or fearful actor. Who knows, your input just might make the difference in preparing and inspiring someone to deliver the performance of a lifetime!

____________________________

 

LIVE THE DREAM YOU WERE BORN TO

 

Acting should be simple. But that doesn’t mean it’s easy. If you are an actor, or know someone who is, and you need a safe place to be yourself and to be challenged to continually grow and share vulnerable performances, Intentional Acting may be the right class for you.

 

There is no better moment than now to make the intention to take full control of your acting career and live the dream you were born to.

 

Call 818-325-5752 or email me at Loren@IntentionalActing.com to interview and sign up for the next Intentional Acting class today.

 

In the meantime, to learn more about Intentional Acting and the 9 questions that frame the work I do with actors of all ages, visit www.intentionalacting.com/what-is-intentional-acting/.

 

 

 

 

Posted by admin, December 4, 2014 11:13 pm

Julia Reilly booked this national commercial for In Touch Ministries!  Way to go, Julia!!

Julia Reilly_InTouchMinistriesSpot

 

 

Posted by admin, December 1, 2014 12:33 pm

Bad Audition?

We all blow it sometimes.  We show up late.  We forget our sides. We don’t follow up.  Then we spend days or weeks (and sometimes years!) beating ourselves up over it.

But what about when the mistake happens DURING the audition?!?!

There you are, in front of a casting director and suddenly, you go blank, lose your place on the page, even drop the script and go out of frame.  Or what about when we mess up saying our own name as we slate?!?  You know, one of those auditions when it feels like nothing’s going right?  What’s the fastest way to pull yourself out of this mess?

Forgive yourself.

Seriously.   Do it…and do it fast.   Beating up on yourself will only allow the critical voice in your head to take that audition from bad to worse to complete crash and burn.  But, when the plane is going down, what does a good pilot do?

#1: Turn off the autopilot (which in an actor’s case is your critical voice.)

#2: Pull that nose up by giving yourself a break.

_____________________

Here are a few quick ways to get that nose back in the air and keep yourself out of that downward spiral:

Keep going.  Don’t let them know you made a mistake. It might not even be a mistake to them until they hear you say “sorry” or see it on your face.

Forgive yourself. Let it go.  Take care of the blunder professionally: find your place, pick up the sides and get back to work.

Use your technique. That’s why you have an acting technique.  When you get lost, you have a tool – your technique – to get you back on track.  Specifically: Make your partner the most important person in the scene by putting your focus on them, instead of your mistake. Fight for your intention – make the reader, or scene partner, feel or do something.

___________________________________

OK…you’ve had that bad audition.  What’s next after you’ve had what you thought, I repeat, *thought* was a bad audition (note the operative words are: “you thought”.)  You never know; that mistake might not be a big deal or you just might be so perfect for what they are looking for that it just doesn’t matter.

So:

Don’t apologize or ask to do it again or make excuses – remember that Acting Tip: No Excuses?

Don’t dwell.  This is a waste of your time and a huge energy drain.  The sooner you let it go, the quicker you can leave it behind.

Change your perception. Your mistake, however epic, is a lesson.  Ask yourself, “What can I learn from this?  Make a mental or written note and move on.  Remember, the best stories come from the biggest goof-ups!

And finally: You are not your mistake. You just made one.  Just like every other actor on the planet.

As always, the best way to prepare so that all your auditions are good ones is to be in class!

If you’re an actor or know someone who is feel free to share this article with those you believe could benefit from it.  Thank you.

 

And risk being vulnerable right here. Share your experience as a fearless or fearful actor. Who knows, your input just might make the difference in preparing and inspiring someone to deliver the performance of a lifetime!

____________________________

 

LIVE THE DREAM YOU WERE BORN TO

 

Acting should be simple. But that doesn’t mean it’s easy. If you are an actor, or know someone who is, and you need a safe place to be yourself and to be challenged to continually grow and share vulnerable performances, Intentional Acting may be the right class for you.

 

There is no better moment than now to make the intention to take full control of your acting career and live the dream you were born to.

 

Call 818-325-5752 or email me at Loren@IntentionalActing.com to interview and sign up for the next Intentional Acting class today.

 

And to learn more about Intentional Acting and the 9 questions that frame the work I do with actors of all ages visit, www.intentionalacting.com/what-is-intentional-acting/.

You are currently browsing the Loren E. Chadima's Intentional Acting blog archives for December, 2014.

Audition Tips