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Archive for April, 2015

Posted by admin, April 29, 2015 5:13 pm

Fighting for your intention is what propels your character (and your performance) forward.  Once you figure out what your objective is and what you’re fighting for, here are the next steps:

What stands in your way? Conflict.  Once you’ve determined what you want to fight for,  figure out what’s keeping you from getting it. Go back to part 4 of Question #1:  what is the conflict in the scene?  Is girl of your dreams in love with the quarterback?  Is a co-worker taking credit for your ideas and getting closer to the promotion you want?  Clearly define your obstacle so you can plan the most interesting way to get around it.  For instance:  If your character comes to a rope bridge with missing planks, you could turn back.  Or, you could decide to cross by going hand-over-hand on what’s left of the rope railing.  Which sounds more interesting to watch?  The most difficult obstacle will almost always be the most interesting choice…and will keep your audience engaged!

Prepare! Always.  All of these steps have to be completed BEFORE you go into the audition or onto the set.  Read your script for clues, do the 9 Questions and fight for your intention.  It will ALWAYS help you to get lost in the scene while creating a natural, compelling performance.

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Know someone who could benefit from this Acting Tip? Please Share!!

www.intentionalacting.com

Posted by admin, April 28, 2015 8:38 pm

My students are forever hearing me tell them to “fight for their intention.” That’s because it’s what drives the scene, crafts your interpretation of a role, and creates a natural, compelling performance.

All of which sets you above rest of the crowd.

“Fighting for your intention.” sounds intense, and it should because it’s the key to making your performance compelling to watch.  And, it’s the fastest way to get out of your head and into your body.

How to make this happen:

What are you fighting for? What do you want to make the other character feel or do?  You need to be able to state it in one very brief sentence:  “I want you to pay to fix my car that you wrecked!” or “I want you to admit you are cheating!”  Without intention, you’re acting without purpose..and that means you’re not driving the scene!  Take control of it by figuring out what your intention is so that you can fight for it.

How do I figure out my objective? Once you’ve answered questions 1 and 2 of the  9 Questions of Intentional Acting,  go to Question #3:  What is the experience of the scene? Imagine yourself in the experience of the scene and figure out what would you want the other character to feel or do.  This is your instinct – go with it. Make it specific: “I need you to feel or do______”   Then fight for it!   And don’t forget:  make your partner the most important person in the scene!

Next Time:  What stands in your way?  Figure it out!

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Know someone who could benefit from this Acting Tip? Please Share!!

www.intentionalacting.com

Posted by admin, April 22, 2015 3:20 pm

Learning to check in is a subtle skill that takes listening to the next level.  In part 1, we talked about what to look for in your scene partner through body language and facial expression.  Checking in will bring you deeper into your scene because it will help you:

-Be Present: I see this in my kids’ classes all the time.  They’re so focused on trying to get the next line out that they’re ignoring that crucial physical response from their scene partner.  The other person’s body language is key here: it brings you into the present and makes your response real.  Without it, you’re not reacting, you’re reciting.

- Be Connected.  Checking in Makes Your Partner the Most Important Person in the Scene:  If you’re focused on your lines or your costume or the how much time is left in class or ANYTHING OTHER than your scene partner, you are NOT reacting.  You’re also not engaging, connecting, or fighting for anything.  Shift your focus back to your scene partner! It will instantly bring you into to the present moment and back to the most important person in the scene.  That’s where you get connected…and that’s where the magic of acting begins.

Remember:  emotion is the by-product of acting, not the source.  You need to stay in the experience to keep your reactions true. And to do this, you must check in and make the other person the most important person in the scene.  This will keep your responses sharp…and your performance authentic!

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Know someone who could benefit from this Acting Tip? Please Share!!

www.intentionalacting.com

Posted by admin, 3:07 pm

Congratulations to Isabella Mulford for booking TWO independent films:

“All Yours”

“The Collaboration”

Way to go, Isabella!!!!

Posted by admin, April 20, 2015 5:30 pm

“Acting is reacting!”  True, but that’s only half of it.  You must also learn to recognize when your intention has landed.  I call it “checking in”:  did your partner really register what you just said?  Checking in is a way to see if you’re actually getting that person to do what you need.

Once you’ve seen your intention land, the second half of acting is to respond with that same intention. This is why acting is not only reacting, it’s also making your scene partner’s reaction part of your fight to get him or her to do what you need.

Good, specific listening requires that you check in to see if your scene partner is affected by your intention.

How do you check in?  How do you know that what you said landed or registered with your scene partner?

Watch for it in their body language in the instant before they reply. Did your partner just tense up?  Roll their eyes?  Slump?  Swallow hard and look hurt?  These are some possible human responses that might occur when someone first internalizes what you’ve just said.  The body always reacts a split second before the words emerge.  It requires that you really listen (not only with your ears but your eyes) to spot that pivotal moment in your partner. Watch for their body movements, facial expressions, and eye contact.  That response is a golden moment because it’s the unfiltered truth.

Make sure you pay attention to your own reactions as well.  You need to be aware of what is happening inside of you, outside of you, and around you in this moment.  Did you receive a negative response?  Indifference?  Anticipation?  Recognizing this will determine how you fight for your next intention.

Next Time:  How checking in makes your partner the most important person in the scene.

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Know someone who could benefit from this Acting Tip? Please Share!!

www.intentionalacting.com

Posted by admin, April 15, 2015 5:51 pm

So why is it so important to keep an Acting Notebook?  Because without it, you’re not tracking information that could help you, you’re not keeping resource data that could serve you, and you’re dooming yourself to repeat past mistakes!

Here’s how to start building a successful Acting Notebook TODAY:

1)       Track ALL of your audition feedback; the good, the bad and the ugly.
There is no better way to track your progress and learn from your mistakes.

2)      Journal about your work in class and in private coachings. What did you learn in each class?  What notes did your teacher give you?  How are you feeling about your acting, your career, and your progress?  By journaling, you’ll begin to see what common notes keep coming up.  Perhaps it’s vulnerability, or remembering not to over-act, or a comment on keeping it simple.  When you see it in written down, you can improve on it.  Amazing, magical things have happened for me when I’ve written regularly about my creative process.

3) Keep a list of Casting Directors and Directors.
I tell this to the actors in my classes all the time!  Every time you watch a movie, a tv show or anything else that grabs your interest, make a note of who the Director and Casting Director were.  Should you happen to meet up with them in an audition, you’ll have an immediate reference for their work and what they’re looking for.  And it’s always great when you can talk to them about what they’ve done!

4) The 9 Questions.
Having these with you will make it a snap to break down any scene before an audition.  Be sure to keep some blank paper in there, too, so you can use those questions again and again!

5) Script Analysis Breakdown Tips.
Intentional Acting Script Analysis Teleseminars are INVALUABLE.  Take the time to listen in, then keep those notes in your Acting Notebook!

6) Acting Tips.

Every time you get an acting tip that speaks to you, whether it be from me, another teacher , a Casting Director, or an actor – put it in your Acting Notebook.  They’ll remind you how to make your partner the most important person in the scene, how to find your intention and fight for it, how to prepare an audition tape and loads more!

7) Your Successes.

Nothing will keep you going like seeing your successes in black and white.  This is one of the toughest businesses around and rejection is everywhere.  So it’s important to keep your spirits up and your eye on the prize.  Looking at what you’ve already done will help you recover faster when you feel discouraged…and it’ll inspire you to keep going!

Know someone who could benefit from this Acting Tip?  Please Share!!

www.intentionalacting.com

Posted by admin, April 9, 2015 5:03 pm

The actors in my class who make the most progress and have the greatest success have one thing in common:

THEY ALWAYS KEEP AN ACTING NOTEBOOK!

Studies have repeatedly shown that people who are highly successful keep track of what they do.
It’s true for diet and exercise and it’s true for acting, too. You can’t evaluate where you’re going if you don’t know where you’ve been.

Having a record of your own personal experiences is an invaluable resource for acting auditions, honing your skills, correcting mistakes and tracking contacts.

Here are a few tips to get you started:

1)      Track ALL of your audition feedback; the good, the bad and the ugly.
There is no better way to track your progress and learn from your mistakes.

2)      Track your notes in class and in private coachings.
What did you learn from in each class?  What notes did your teacher give you?  When you track those, you’ll begin to see a pattern emerge.  Once you know what the common notes are, you can start making improvements on them.

3) Keep a list of Casting Directors and Directors.
I tell this to the kids in my classes all the time!  Every time you watch a movie, a TV show or anything else that grabs your interest, make a note of who the Director and Casting Director were.  Should you happen to meet up with them in an audition, you’ll have an immediate reference for their work and what they’re looking for.  And it’s always great when you can talk to them about their work!

FOR NEXT WEEK:  How to build YOUR Acting Notebook!!!

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Know someone who could benefit from this Acting Tip?  Please Share!!

www.intentionalacting.com

You are currently browsing the Loren E. Chadima's Intentional Acting blog archives for April, 2015.

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