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Archive for the ‘Parents of Child Actors’ Category

Posted by admin, September 21, 2016 7:38 pm

Great Job Indie Nameth on your speaking role in a Xfinity Commercial!!

Watch Indie Here!

Posted by admin, February 16, 2016 12:48 am

Make sure you don’t miss my client Isabella Balbi as Kourtney Kardsashian TONIGHT on The People v O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story on Fox!  So proud of you!

Posted by admin, February 15, 2016 3:13 pm

Intentional Acting FREE TeleSeminar

Be Ready to Book in 2016

For Parents and Actors of All Ages

Attend a FREE class on the phone!

Tuesday, Feb 23rd, 2016  @ 12:00pm

or Tuesday, Feb 23rd, 2016 @ 5:30 pm

Is your audition prep as thorough as it can be?

Have you nailed the audition and later found out that you missed important research information that may have cost you the job?

Do you feel clueless on how to help your child breakdown a script for an audition?

If you answered, “Yes” you are not alone.  Many actors and parents overlook the value of the proper research and essential script analysis skills needed to book the job.

In this eye-opening, 45-minute Free TeleSeminar Loren will introduce you to 8 Keys to researching your role and breaking down a script so you are ready to  quickly and effectively.

By the end of this 45-minute career-altering introduction to Script Analysis you will learn a replicable formula for easily uncovering the critical clues for delivering a great performance by learning:

  • The key to telling you what to wear
  • What the Casting Directors are looking for.
  • How the format of the script will tell you loads of information in seconds.
  • And you’ll also discover that your biggest friend is the question, “Why?”
  • How to uncover and make sense of the clues of a script
  • Why 98% of the time the writer is telling you everything you need to know to make the strongest acting choice.

Ready to stop guessing what Casting Directors want and to start to easily finding all the clues that will help you book more roles?

RSVP Today for a FREE 45-Minute TeleSeminar

Email: Loren@IntentionalActing.com

Why should you take time out of your busy schedule to be on this TeleSeminar? It’s simple. Your booking ratio could depend on it.

Posted by admin, February 12, 2016 10:00 am

My student, Kacey Fifield, booked the lead in an independent film called “The Lost”. Congrats Kasey!

Posted by admin, February 11, 2016 1:00 am

The best advice I can give the parents of young actors is that your behavior is as important, sometimes even more important, than your child’s. You may be the only thing standing in the way of your child booking the job.

When an Agent, Casting Director, or Producer casts your child, they know that they will be dealing with you and spending as much time on set with you as they will with your child.  It is important that they like you and know you’re going to be easy and agreeable.

I have had agents and managers who have wanted to represent students of mine, but the parents were too difficult, so they passed on the child. I also know kids who have been released from set because the parents were demanding and difficult.

Here are two things that can help you help your child book the job:

1. Be a happy and nurturing parent. Be flexible, patient, kind and helpful. And if you can’t be, get help, or send another adult in your place.

2. Hire a coach to prepare you and your child for meetings and auditions.  Don’t be your child’s coach and/or manager.

Share your experience as the parent of an actor.  Remember you are a part of a community and your experience  can be a valuable learning tool and inspiration for other parents with young actors.

Posted by admin, February 8, 2016 10:17 pm

I am so proud of my client Madison Hu.  She booked a lead role, Frankie, in a Disney Pilot, which is now going to network.  The series is called “Bizaardvark” and it premiers in the summer of 2016!  Way to go Madison!

 

 

Posted by admin, January 20, 2016 7:29 pm

The great artist Michelangelo once said about his artistry that, “If people only knew how hard I work to gain my mastery, it wouldn’t seem so wonderful at all.”

The life of an artist.  The world sees our work and because of the blood, sweat and tears we pour into our craft it all looks so easy.  But, the moments that seem easy are due to all the hard work it took to get there.

Make It Easy

This December, I found myself watching the contortionists of Cirque du Soleil and realized that they make acrobatics look so easy that I forget how impossibly hard it is.  I took for granted the strength, the flexibility, the practice, and courage it takes to achieve those feats.

Acting is the same.  Great actors make acting seem easy.  But I see a lot of actors who take the craft of acting for granted.  They think “I can do that” and they audition, go to casting workshops, do showcases; all without having a good teacher, being in a regular class or even practicing in front of a camera.  By the way, these are the same actors complaining that they’re not booking.

Respect Your Craft

Great acting requires consistent practice, a good coach and personal courage to build the emotional strength and emotional flexibility required to perform great roles.  Respect your craft.

The way you show casting you’re an actor who respects their craft is by ensuring that your audition tape is as good as it can be.  Let us not overlook the obvious here:  if you want to book jobs this pilot season (especially when you are one of a 100 submissions), you have to deliver an audition that makes casting say “WOW.”  At the very least, don’t leave them with a bad impression by submitting a lame audition tape.

If you don’t have the time or can’t afford a professional to put you on tape, then make sure you master the keys for an awesome audition tape.

Here are 8 tips to help you:

1. Pick a quiet space that has little to no back ground noise.  TVs, fans, running water and air conditioning distract the viewer when heard in the background.

2. The wall behind you should be white or blue.

3. Position yourself a few feet away from the wall to avoid casting shadows.

4. Be sure you are lit well so that the viewer can clearly see your face and eyes.

5. Record a test sample.  Check it on your computer.  Make sure that you can clearly see and hear yourself.  Remember:  if you can’t see or hear yourself, neither can the Casting Director.

6. The camera should be on a tripod to keep the frame steady. If you don’t have a tripod, use a stable surface.

7. Before shooting the scene, do your script analysis and research and ask the 9 Questions of Intentional Acting.

8. Record all your rehearsals. Your rehearsals may be your best takes!

—————-

Know someone who could benefit from this acting tip?  Please share!

Posted by admin, April 1, 2014 8:00 am

By Loren Chadima

Ask anyone who has taken classes at Intentional Acting and they will tell you intention is the name of the game. So let’s play a quick game and qualify what makes a good intention.

Is “I want the ice cream,” a good intention?  Or is it an action?

It is an action. A good intention will connect you to the other person in the scene. To reframe that line so that it is an intention and makes another person feel or do something, it would read something like this: “I need you to give me the ice cream.”

Acting Is Doing

What connects actors and puts life into a scene is actors needing something from one another, in other words having intentions. “I want the Ice cream.” says that I can take it from you and I don’t need you to do anything.

Whereas, “I need you to give me the ice cream” makes you need the other actor and have to engage with them in an action. The latter will give both actors something to do. And remember Acting is Doing. Also notice that intention is more specific than an action, which is always better.

__________________________

If you’re an actor or know someone who is feel free to share this article on being present with those you believe could benefit from it. Thank you.

Remember, as an actor, you’re part of an inspiring community. Share your experiences in the comments below. This is your inspirational story and can serve as a valuable learning tool for others.

__________________________

LIVE THE DREAM YOU WERE BORN TO!

Acting should be simple. But that doesn’t mean it’s easy. If you’re an actor or you know someone who is, there is no better moment than now to make the intention to take full control of your acting career and live the dream you were born to.

Call 818-325-5752 or email me at Loren@IntentionalActing.com to interview and sign up for the next Intentional Acting class today.

In the meantime, to learn more about Intentional Acting and the 9 Questions that frame the work I do with actors of all ages visit www.intentionalacting.com/what-is-intentional-acting/.

 

 

 

Posted by admin, February 12, 2014 2:43 pm

The audition just ended, you walk out of the room and you’re still wearing the glow from the performance. Now what do you do next, other than remember to breathe?

As my friend Brian from Performer Track says, “Don’t just leave. Sit down in the waiting room and remember what happened during the audition.” In other words, write down your experience.

What Do You Write?

Whether you write your experience in a notebook, phone or check out Performer Track, it is imperative that you write it down and capture the essence of what just unfolded in the audition. Your experience cannot simply be logged in your head because it is likely you will end up overlooking the key pieces to your performance that will be important to remember for your call back.

So what do you write?

  1. Who were all the people in the room? (Don’t know? Kindly ask the assistant.)
  2. What were the adjustments they gave you?
  3. What did they say?
  4. Pull out your 9 Questions of Intentional Acting. Answer them according to what you did in the audition room. (If you don’t know these crucial questions for acting please message me here on Facebook or email me at http://intentionalacting.com/contact/ and I’ll email them to you.)
  5. Be sure to write down anything else remarkable you can remember about the experience.

You’re Ready For Your Callback

After writing down your experience you will be much more aware of exactly what you did and how to do it again. Now you’re ready for your callback.

And yes – wear the same thing, unless they tell you otherwise. Notice I say WHEN you get the callback, not IF.

___________________________

If you’re an actor or know someone who is feel free to share this article with those you believe could benefit from it. Thank you.

And if you’re an actor and have experience with writing down your thoughts after an audition don’t hesitate to share your thoughts in the comments below. Who knows, your input just might make the difference in preparing and inspiring a fellow actor in such a way as to change the course of someone’s career and life.

____________________________

LIVE THE DREAM YOU WERE BORN TO

Acting should be simple. But that doesn’t mean it’s easy. If you’re an actor or you know someone who is, there is no better moment than now to make the intention to take full control of your acting career and live the dream you were born to.

Call 818-985-8504818-985-8504 or email me at Loren@IntentionalActing.com to interview and sign up for the next Intentional Acting class today.

In the meantime, to learn more about Intentional Acting and the 9 questions that frame the work I do with actors of all ages visit www.intentionalacting.com/what-is-intentional-acting/.

 

 

Posted by admin, February 8, 2014 8:32 pm

Intentional Acting Industry Day

The intent of Intentional Acting classes is solely educational. Any class in which an Industry Professional such as: Casting Director, Manager, Agent, Producer, Director, has been invited to teach, speak, or observe is for educational purposes only and by no means an audition for work. It is not a job interview. The presence of industry members is neither a guarantee nor a promise of employment, but what your child will get is usable skills that they can apply to their next audition.

You are currently browsing the archives for the Parents of Child Actors category.

Audition Tips