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Archive for the ‘Parents of Child Actors’ Category

Posted by admin, February 8, 2014 8:29 pm

Intentional Acting “Script Analysis” TeleSeminar

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Have you ever prepared for an audition and later found out that you missed an important clue in the script that might have cost you the job?

Do you resort to “Making Stuff Up” when you’re breaking down a script?

If you answered, “Yes” you’re not alone.  Many actors do because they overlook the value of essential script analysis skills needed to book the job.

In this eye-opening, 45-minute Free TeleSeminar Loren will introduce you the 7 keys you need to break down a script quickly.

By the end of this 45-minute career-altering introduction to Script Analysis you will learn a replicable formula for easily uncovering the critical clues for delivering a great performance by learning:

  • The importance of the page number
  • What answers lay in the title
  • How the format of the script will tell you whether it is Drama or Comedy.
  • And you’ll also discover that your biggest friend is the question, “Why?”
  • How to uncover and make sense of the clues of a script for your performances.
  • Why 98% of the time the writer is telling you everything you need to know to make the strongest acting choice.

If you are ready to stop making up the story of the script and instead quickly and easily find all the clues on the page to create a performance of a life-time then this FREE TeleSeminar is for you.

A FREE 45-Minute TELESEMINAR

Simply dial into the call, take notes and experience a new way of finding the clues in the script which will help you book the job.

Email Loren to book your spot on the next Teleseminar: Loren@IntentionalActing.com

Why should you take time out of your busy schedule to be on this TeleSeminar?    It’s simple. Your acting career is worth it.


 

Posted by admin, January 22, 2014 5:50 pm

The moment before is a very important part of a good audition. Film and television scenes often cut into the middle of a conversation.  The scene before is older man laying in a hospital bed and the next scene his daughter crying. We don’t see that character die but we can deduce what happened based on the editing.  But it’s up to the actor, in this case the daughter, to create the moment before.

Audition sides cut into the action and the actor must answer the Question #1,  bullet point #3 – What is the moment before?

99% of the time the answer to what happened the moment before can be found in the script. But in a cold reading panic, actors go to MSU – Make Stuff Up University. Train yourself to read the script, find the clues, before you MSU, so that you can make a specific choice.

Correct script analysis is important because the moment before can change the entire intention of the scene. Did she just kiss him or slap him?  Dialogue that follows either of the latter moments can be very similar, but the intention will be different.  The Casting Director will know what the moment before is.  If you make it up and miss what is written in the script, it will show the CD a lack of training and experience.

The moment before is very important in a commercial audition. Commercials are so short and they need what my directing teacher called a “Pre-Life.” A moment before creates that feeling of “life” before the scene.

Michael Caine suggests relaxing into the scene.  Many actors take a full breath  – in and out – before they start the scene and then they say their first line.  Instead, relax into the scene, breathe in then say your first line or take your first action.

Try it. See what happens, then comment below and let other actors know how your moment before helped your audition.

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If you’re an actor or know someone who is, feel free to share this article with those you believe could benefit from it. Thank you.

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LIVE THE DREAM YOU WERE BORN TO

Acting should be simple. But that doesn’t mean it’s easy. If you’re an actor or you know someone who is, there is no better moment than now to make the intention to take full control of your acting career and live the dream you were born to.

Call 818-985-8504 or email me at Loren@IntentionalActing.com to interview and sign up for the next Intentional Acting class today.

 

 

Posted by admin, January 16, 2014 8:53 pm

“I have to take the time after the show to not go, ‘Check out what I just did.’ It’s more like, ‘Wow! I’m so thankful that I was able to do that – that I was able to participate in that. And whatever wave was pushing me through that (performance) was awesome.  And wherever that wave came from I’m so glad that I was able to catch it.” ~ Jason Mraz

Jason Mraz is one of my favorite artists.  I think this quote applies to actors as well.  He describes the feeling of what I call a “Zone” performance.  You know that feeling when everything just seems perfect: you’re connected to the other actor, the words flow, you’re in the moment, you’re listening and responding and the camera and anyone watching just seems to slip away. You’re just there, in the “Zone” and it feels magical. That’s what I love about acting – it’s addicting.

Jason also puts the ego in its place as well.  I notice that my best performances haven’t felt like “I” was doing it. It felt like something greater than me just flowed right through me.

You can learn more about how the 9 Questions of Intentional Acting can help you create that magical “Zone” performance at www.intentionalacting.com/what-is-intentional-acting/

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If you’re an actor or know someone who is feel free to share this article with those you believe could benefit from it. Thank you.

And be sure to share your experiences of your magical “Zone performances. Who knows your input just might make the difference in inspiring someone else to deliver the performance of a lifetime.
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LIVE THE DREAM YOU WERE BORN TO

Acting should be simple. But that doesn’t mean it’s easy. If you’re an actor or you know someone who is, there is no better moment than now to make the intention to take full control of your acting career and live the dream you were born to.

Call 818-325-5752 or email me at Loren@IntentionalActing.com to interview and sign up for the next Intentional Acting class today.

In the meantime, to learn more about Intentional Acting and the 9 questions that frame the work I do with actors of all ages visit www.intentionalacting.com/what-is-intentional-acting/.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by admin, January 2, 2014 5:49 pm

The holidays are over and as an actor, perhaps the busiest and most important season of the year is just about to happen.

Yep, you guessed it. It’s Pilot Season.

Whether you’re just starting out as an actor or you’re a veteran of the pilot season, when it comes to being at the top of your game, pilot season truly is crunch time for actors. With that in mind, let’s take a quick look at what you’ll need to be at your best when it matters most.

2,000 ACTORS BEING SUBMITTED FOR EACH ROLE

In an industry that is known almost as much for its head-scratching ironies as it is for its life-altering inspiration, pilot season seems to be a bit of both. I say this because pilot season provides a unique space for actors to shine and inspire through their craft. But the opportunities to secure coveted acting jobs are not what they used to be.

Although the distribution outlets for entertainment content has expanded exponentially in recent years, there are fewer pilots being made. Where there used to be over 300 pilots made in one season, now there may be only 30.

Studios are not making as many films either which means more movie stars go to television, not just to star in series, but to do three-or-four-episode guest roles. Remember there are over 2000 actors being submitted for every role.  You have to be at your very best when that audition comes in.

TIME FOR PILOT INVENTORY

There are a number of ways and means to ensure you’re fully prepared for pilot season. One of the more important ways to be prepared, which is often overlooked, is taking an inventory.

An honest inventory is necessary or it really doesn’t work. And it is crucial that you have your coach or teacher give you feedback so that you ensure you’re on the right track.

Here are six questions to help with your pilot inventory.

1. Are you breaking down a script and making the strongest choice?

2. Are you owning the room when you walk into the audition?

3. Do you adjust quickly if you’re not in the mood or something happens in the waiting room to throw you off?

4. Are you really adjusting to the direction the CD gave you or are you giving them the same thing twice?

5. Are your headshots working for you? Looking like you? Resume up to date?

6. Are you in class? Professional actors, like professional athletes – Practice.

This is your Pre-Season for Pilot-Season. So be sure to take your inventory, practice and go get that role! If not you, than who?

Loren

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If you’re an actor or know someone who has a working knowledge of preparing for pilot season please feel free to share this article with those you believe could benefit from it. Thank you.

And be sure to share your experience as an actor with inventory results below. Who knows, your input just might make the difference in preparing and inspiring someone to land a role of a lifetime.

________________________________________________

LIVE THE DREAM YOU WERE BORN TO

Acting should be simple. But that doesn’t mean it’s easy. If you’re an actor or you know someone who is, there is no better moment than now to make the intention to take full control of your acting career and live the dream you were born to.

Call 818-325-5752 or email me at Loren@IntentionalActing.com to interview and sign up for the next Intentional Acting class today.

 

 

Posted by admin, November 11, 2013 8:46 pm

The number thing that blocks an actor from creating an authentic performance or audition is not relating to the scene (Question #2 of the 9 Questions of Intentional Acting) or often described as “Judging the Character”.

The only way you can get inside the shoes of your character and live their circumstances or also described as “Be the character” is if you relate, connect, and believe the character’s convictions.  But if you judge them, you instantly cut yourself off from being the character.

Here’s how to know if you’re judging your character. Listen to yourself and notice if you’re saying any of these statements or anything similar to them.

  • “I’m not that.”
  • “I don’t like her or him.”
  • “He’s dumb.”
  • “I would never do that.”
  • “I would never say that.”
  • “I can’t say that.”
  • “He or she is mean.”
  • “My character is the bad guy.”
  • “She’s a bitch.”

Start again – look for the positive attributes of the character. What you do you like about your character? How can you relate to your character?

For example, if I got the opportunity to play Osama Bin Laden, I’d have to focus on the fact that he is passionate and believed that he was doing the absolute best thing for his people.  I can relate to that. I am passionate and want to do the best thing for my people.

Find ways to connect to your character so you can put yourself in their shoes and you will Be the Character.”

In the comments below whare ways that you connect to your character and step in their shoes.

 

Posted by admin, September 25, 2013 2:01 pm

Many actors tell me that when they go into an audition they just want to “Get it Right.” But “Getting it Right” doesn’t get them the part.  Because when you focus on “Getting It Right…”

  1. You become the most important person in the scene.
  2. It creates no reason for you to connect to the other person in the scene.
  3. It puts you in judgment of your performance and doesn’t allow you to be in the moment of the scene.

“Getting it Right” doesn’t allow the actor to experience what the scene is about and leaves an actor feeling unsatisfied, in turn, leaves the Casting Director unsatisfied and on to the next actor.

Make sure you breakdown that scene and you know what your character’s intention is: What do you want the other character to feel or do. Connect to that intention, how do you relate to that, make it personal and fight for that intention. Then allow the experience of the scene to unfold.

More likely, this is what will get you a call back and the part.

Share below your audition experiences and how you prepare for an audition.

 

Posted by admin, August 21, 2013 1:47 pm

Here’s a quote from Anna Camp from True Blood.  ”I had no idea, actually, that I was gonna kiss the head, it just sort of happened…If I get an impulse that’s, like, creepy, I’m like, why not? They can always tell me not to do it. But better to be pulled back than to be pushed forward.”

In the Intentional Acting Industry Days, Casting Directors always say, “It’s easier to ask an actor to tone it down, than it is to ask an actor bring it up.”

The idea of allowing yourself to go big really just tells your critical voice to be quiet and tells you to risk trusting your instincts. That’s what Anna Camp did – she risked trusting her instincts.  Risk it. Trust your instincts and see what you discover.

Posted by admin, July 31, 2013 2:24 pm

Many Casting Directors and Directors will communicate using “Result Directions.”  They are valid direction but as my teacher, Anne Bogart, taught me, “An actor needs to know how to fill it.” Here are some examples of Result Directions:

1. Line readings: “Say it like this…”

2. Facial Expressions: “Give me a sad face.”

3. Gestures:  “Hold your hand like this, on this line.”

4. Result Coaching:   “Act cute.”  “Be coy”  “ Be Sarcastic.”

You “fill it” by finding the intention and connecting your intention to the other person – the most important person in the scene. Here’s how to “Fill It:”

1. “Say it like this” Listen to the meaning of the line rather than what it sounds like. Communicate the meaning.

2. “Give me a sad face.” Ask yourself – why am I sad and what do I want to make the other person in the scene feel?

3. “Hold your hand like this, on this line.” Ask yourself – why do I make this gesture now and what will it make the other person in the scene feel?

4. “Act cute.” “Be coy.” “Be sarcastic.” Ask yourself – when you’re being cute, coy or sarcastic – what do you what the other person to feel?

Your answers will give you the intention, now fight for your intention. This will “fill in” the result direction and give the director something with which to work.

How do you work with result direction?  Share your experience in the comments.

 

Posted by admin, July 10, 2013 3:37 pm

These are answers direct from Casting Director’s mouths who have come as Guest Speakers to Intentional Acting.

Here are the DONT’S in asking questions in the audition room.

1. Don’t ask a question just to ask a question.

Many actors have heard through the grapevine  “You should ask a question.”  It’s seems like a good way to build rapport with casting.  But it’s not.  They know when you’re trying to force relationship and it will work against you. And definitely….

2. Don’t ask a personal question to make small talk.

3. Don’t ask a question if the answer is in the script.

Do your homework. Breakdown that script. Know how to pronounce words and names. (That’s why you have the internet on your phone.)  You can even ask the assistant.

4. Don’t ask a question about how they want you to play something and then not be able to deliver it.

If you can’t deliver the redirect – don’t ask for it. Nothing will hurt you more. And if you can’t deliver the redirect – GET IN A CLASS!

Share below how you’ve managed questions in your auditions and help another actor.

 

Posted by admin, July 3, 2013 3:38 pm

Actors tell me about their auditions afterwards and often they tell me they had a question that they wanted to ask but didn’t. Asking questions is a good thing and here are some benefits of asking questions in auditions. But, read next week’s blog to find out which questions can hurt your audition.

6 benefits to asking questions in an audition:

1.  Questions give the Casting Director an opportunity to elaborate on what they are looking for which helps you to know and deliver exactly what they want.

2.  Questions give you clarification so that your mind is free of, “Well this is stupid.”  “Am I doing it right?” and all the other garbage that gets in the way of you being in the moment and giving your best performance when it matters most.

3.  Questions allow you to walk away from an audition knowing you did your best when it mattered most.

4.  Questions show the Casting Director you’ve done your homework and that you’re well prepared.

5.  Questions show the CastingDirector that you are an actor who knows how to make a choice and can back it up.

6.  Questions show the Casting Director that you understand and can take direction.

When has asking a question helped you in an audition.  Please comment and use this as an opportunity to help another actor.


 

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